Monthly Archives: June 2014

‘Over 50’s more scared of dementia than cancer’: I’m more terrified of the ‘harrowing neglect’ in our care system ……

As The Telegraph report people over 50 are more scared of dementia than cancer, I have to say I am terrified of any condition which might mean I need to rely on our care system when I get older.

As someone over 50, and who is currently spending every weekend at the hospital bedside and my mother in law because I’m so scared that without family around she will be seen as nothing more than ‘care home fodder’, the thought of requiring care, either in hospital or outside of hospital, once you hit the post 80 mark is a terrifying prospect to me.

There has been too many high profile inquiries to suggest these are anomalies in the care system, for example, following the inquest into care at Orchard View the Serous Case Review into the deaths of 5 older people has been published. The coroner has heavily criticised the quality of care at the Southern Cross home, and expressed incredulity that many staff were still working in the care industry, stating that “there could be another Orchid View operating somewhere else”.

The Daily Mail reports

‘Britain’s worst care home’: Damning report into ‘harrowing neglect’ at £3,000-a-month home aims to stop ‘institutionalised abuse’ of the elderly: Serious Case Review has made 34 recommendations after examining failings at Orchid View care home in Copthorne, West SussexRead more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2652709/Orchid-View-care-home-receive-damning-report-published-today.html#ixzz34ELlbfW6
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I’m afraid the type of ‘care’ received by those at Orchard View is not confined to Orchard View.

In 2010 the Royal Medical Colleges concluded inadequate hospital care for older people condemned many to death. In 2011 The Health Service Ombudsman suggested the NHS was inflicting pain and suffering on older people, and was indifferent to older people. In 2012 Bingham suggested the treatment of older people in care is now so bad in many cases it meets the definition of ‘torture’.

Just for clarity Amnesty International has outlined the techniques used in ‘torture’, these include isolation, enforced trivial demands, degradation, threats, displays of power (i.e. controlling food and hydration, physical assault).

For some older people in care today, whether in the public or private sector, that is their care, torture.

No wonder from a European perspective research suggests older people’s experience of ageing in the UK falls behind that of many of it’s European counterparts (WRVS,2012).

Older people’s experience of ageing in the UK can be improved, and it is all of our responsibility to try to achieve this. However, we first need a coherent strategy to bring about the change desired by many who work with older people. Government in the UK tend to address issues associated with an ageing population in individual ‘silos’. Research from Europe suggests those countries taking a joined up approach where government consider how factors such as income, health, age discrimination and inclusion interact , the more successful policy approaches are likely to be to improve the experience of ageing. However, any policy needs first to have a strong ethical foundation founded on a clear understanding of, and agreement to, promoting older people’s equality and human rights.

There is clear evidence in the UK that poor levels of care, in both the private and public sector, is far to prevalent in our care system. Whilst the focus currently is on the leaders and professionals charged with developing and delivering care, wider society too has a role in ensuring compassion in care is the ‘norm’ and not the exception, as The Independent suggests

‘For a while we may pause to express outrage. But we then move on to the urgent business of our daily lives. Spot checks and hit squads may arrest the worst practice…but they will not do much about a society that has hardened its heart against the elderly’

Whilst many older people receive good quality care, the majority provided by friends and family, far too big a proportion of those requiring higher levels of care are failed by care providers in our system. It is not good enough to keep using the same old rhetoric, better training (what type and where from?), minimum standards (we have these), ‘big society’ need to take more responsibility. We have heard all of this before, and still the abuse continues.

Both my mother (82yrs) and mother-in-law (86yrs) have made clear to me this weekend they do not want to end up in residential care, the very thought fills them with horror. They remind me of the older people I worked with two decades ago who used to equate a stay in hospital with the workhouse and its associated horrors.

It struck me, it must feel terrifying being an older person requiring care today.